When you’re out of warranty anyways, you’ve got nothing to lose- a story of desperation and triumph

So, remember how I told you all that my conventional brother sewing machine had died a year and a half ago? Well, it did and I shall explain what happened.

I got her for Christmas many years ago, she replaced my kenmore machine, the very first one I learned to sew on. Well, this brother machine had all kinds of bells and whistles. Fancy stitches, button hole capability, and it was great. She got the job done for the most part. I used her for everything. Well, one day when I went to plug the pedal into the back of the machine, the plug went in and felt like it was not connecting to anything. The connector for the pedal cord had come loose inside the machine. I shook it and could hear it rattling around inside.

Ughhhhh great. Thankfully I had become more used to using Gert and just relied on her. And a beautiful partnership was made. That sad plastic brother machine sat covered up on the shelf until last month I realized that I really needed to use the zig zag on her.

For about a year I pestered Tony to help take it apart and fix it. Yeah yeah, I’ll do it next weekend he’d say. Then we’d both forget to do it, or something would come up, or the thought of taking up the entire kitchen table with sewing machine parts became overwhelming.

I knew what was wrong, and other than the pedal connector rolling around inside, there was nothing else wrong with her. So, one gloomy day, I hauled that machine upstairs along with all the screw drivers and got to work. What did I have to lose? The cost of getting it repaired would be more than the machine was worth anyways, and I was out of warranty. So I put all the screws in an ice cube tray with labels as to where I found them.

Pre op machine. Ready to be taken apart.

I had seen the inside of my other machine when I oiled her, so how scary could it get? Um, a little. 

More computer parts than I’m used to, but not unlike the printers we would take apart at Stream. So, it wasn’t as terrible as I thought. I got more comfortable when I knew I was documenting what I was taking apart.

That dumb connector was behind everything and the hardest thing to get to. Part way through dissection, I had to text Tony to ask about connectors on one of the computer chips. Its a good thing he reads his emails. and look, that stupid black plug at the bottom of the machine beside the pliers was right off. The plastic piece holding it in place was missing.

Nothing like jamming your hand under a bunch of things so you can use gorilla glue to get pieces back in place. Then I put it all together and was like VICTORY! Except, I got error messages when I tried sewing.

Now this totally brought me back to my days of tech support. Took it all apart, realized I had missed a connector to a computer chip.

Got cocky and put it together again. I got this, just a disconnected cord.

Another error message. This time it said the foot was up when it was clearly down. So, had to go back in, and find the sensor for the presser foot, and make sure it was in the right position. Finally, it worked.

I had fixed my sewing machine on my own.

VICTORY INDEED!

I’m not as terrified of my machines as I used to be, or taking anything apart honestly (unless it can electrocute me, then HARD PASS).

I think this is why I took Nancy apart. Documenting and videotaping and photographing all the steps I took. She’s far more simple than this guy in some ways.

I also appreciate the quality of my vintage machines even more. Seriously, so much plastic in these new machines. My others are made of cast iron and have some solid parts to them.

 

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